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Grease Management Residential FOG

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The build up of fats, oils and grease in the sewer system causes sewer blockages. This eventually results in sewer backups that can overflow onto streets and into homes, damaging property and the environment. Untreated sewage can flow into storm drain inlets, creeks, lakes or rivers. Most overflows are relatively small and can be stopped and cleaned up quickly. If not addressed, overflows can result in property damage, strong odors, and environmental, health and safety problems.

In neighborhoods that experience sewer blockages and backups due to fats, oils and grease sewer system maintenance is expensive and can contribute to increasing costs for sewer service.

Did you know that approximately 85 percent of grease-related sewer blockages and overflows originate in residential areas? All households play an important role in preventing neighborhood sewer system blockages. Cobb County’s goal is to take a proactive approach to pollution prevention which focuses on proper FOG disposal, thus protecting the environment and decreasing sewer maintenance costs.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q. What is FOG?

A: FOG refers to fats, oil, and grease, which are the natural by-products of food preparation and cooking or baking. When poured down the drain, they can form clogs and blockages that lead to sewer overflows.

 

image of ice cream alt alt
FATS OIL GREASE

Fats typically come from meat and dairy sources but can also come from plant sources, such as nut butters. It is usually in solid form at room temperature and can be thrown directly into the trash.  Placing these foods in the garbage disposal only reduces the size of the food, not the likelihood of creating a clog.  If you are not sure whether something contains fat, check the nutrition label.

Oil comes from plant sources such as vegetable oil, canola oil, olive oil, corn oil, etc. It may be used as a topping on food, such as salads or sandwiches, or used to cook food, such as deep frying. It remains liquid at room temperature. Used oil should be poured into a can or jar before disposal.  If it is poured down the drain, oil can coat pipes and get into nooks and crannies, creating a slick surface that fats and grease stick to easily.

Grease occurs when fats from food melt under heat such as frying, boiling and baking, etc. Grease is deceptive because it is a liquid after cooking, but eventually cools into a solid. Sometime after pouring it down the drain it will cool on the pipes in the collection system, then harden, and start a clog.

Unclogging Strategy: Place fats directly in the trash or another container before placing in the trash can for proper disposal.

Unclogging Strategy: Pour used oil into a jar or can with a lid before placing in the trash can. Hot water and soap do not eliminate oil; it will eventually reform in pipes. 

Unclogging Strategy: Pour liquid grease into a grease can or other container with a lid and place in the trash once it has cooled. Running hot water over greasy cookware in the sink only pushes it into the pipes where it hardens.

SOURCES:
alt MEAT TRIMMINGS
alt POULTRY SKIN
alt CHEESES
alt ICE CREAM
alt PEANUT BUTTER
alt BUTTER

SOURCES:
alt SALAD DRESSING
alt COOKING OIL
alt VEGETABLE OIL
alt CANOLA OIL
alt OLIVE OIL
alt CORN OIL

SOURCES:
alt COOKED/MELTED
alt FAT FROM MEAT
alt BACON/SAUSAGE
alt SKIN FROM BOILED POULTRY
alt GRAVY
alt MAYONNAISE/ SALAD DRESSING

 

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