Cobb County Government
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Cobb appoints and swears-in new chief of police

On the recommendation of County Manager Rob Hosack, the Cobb Board of Commissioners voted to appoint Michael Register as chief of police at its June 13 meeting. He was sworn-in by Department of Public Safety Director Sam Heaton. Register was joined by his wife Keisha (pictured), his former deputy chiefs from Clayton County (pictured) and his new deputy chiefs from Cobb (not pictured).

"I'm very honored to return to Cobb County as the chief of police, and look forward to leading this great department into the future," Register said.

He has more than 30 years of operational and supervisory law enforcement experience. He most recently served as the chief of police for the Clayton County Police Department. He worked for Cobb's Police Department from 1986 to 2005, serving in many tactical, operational and leadership positions, including assistant academy director and assistant SWAT and tactical team commander.

Register has also managed a law enforcement, operational and intelligence program at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. and serves on the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force Executive Board, the Georgia Association of Chiefs of Police Legislative Committee as co-chair and is a board member for Safe America. He also served in the U.S. Army Special Forces for 22 years, including combat operations in Afghanistan.

Register is working on his doctoral dissertation in public administration and policy, with an emphasis in terrorism and conflict analysis and resolution. He earned a master’s degree in public administration from Columbus State University and a bachelor’s degree in accounting and international finance from Liberty University. Register also attended Northwestern University’s nationally-recognized Police Staff and Command School and the Georgia Command College. He is an adjunct professor at Columbus State in the areas of strategic planning, management and leadership.

Register replaces Chief John Houser, who retired in January after serving Cobb County for 35 years.